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FAQs & other tips & tricks

Contents:

1. I don’t have to sprinkle the yeast onto warm water & allow it to activate – is that right?

2. Do I have to pre-cook the apple to make the filling?

3. I would like to knead the dough by hand. How do I do that? 

4. Instead of using the foil tins, can I use my own baking tin/s?

5. How do I know if my dough has risen sufficiently?

6. At what stage of the baking process can I hit the pause button & do it another day?

7. What's the difference between the 'Knead' & 'No-knead' method?

8. EXTRA TIPS!

 

1. I don’t have to sprinkle yeast onto warm water & allow it to activate – is that right?

Yup! There's no need to do that at all. We can't speak for other recipes, but for our apple pie cinnamon scrolls, it's not necessary at all. 

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2. Do I have to pre-cook the apple to make the filling?

We did some research (aka googled) this question. Some in the baking community swear by pre-cooking their apples and others leave it raw. So we decided to test which method was better ourselves.

TEST: We baked up half of our scrolls using raw cubed apple pieces and the other half were first sautéed in a pan with ~1-2 tbsp of unsalted butter until golden brown.

Left use: pre-cooked apple; Right side: raw apple

Left side had pre-cooked apple vs raw pieces, on the right

VERDICT: Once the scrolls were baked and covered in that light cream cheese glaze, we honestly couldn’t tell the difference!

To be fair, if you do pick the apples out, you can distinguish which apple piece were made using which method. The sautéed apple pieces were more flavourful vs the raw apples. Secondly, a benefit of pre-cooking your apple is that you won't have to worry whether they have been thoroughly cooked in the oven or not.

To conclude, in our recipe, we omitted the step to sauté the apple. But if you want to take that extra step to pre-cook them, then go for it (use 1½ up to 2 apples)!

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3. I would like to knead the dough by hand. How do I do that?

We suggest you watch this video via All Recipes on how to knead dough here. You’ll know your dough is ready when it has a smooth appearance, hold its shape & you can stretch it to a very thin consistency between your fingers. 

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4. Instead of using the foil tins, can I use my own baking tin/s?

Definitely! Just be aware that the baking time will vary depending on the type of tin you use. Our general recommendation is to start checking at the 20 min mark & go from there. If you are using a small tin, we’d suggest start at the 10 min mark.

Second, make sure each scroll is spread out by a few cm apart if you want them to grow into each other.

In a round 9” (23cm) round cake tin, with 8 scrolls, it took approx. 20-25 mins to bake. If you want to bake all 12 scrolls in the one baking tin, look for a rectangle baking tin of approx. min. length 33cm x width 22cm. It will take around 30-40 mins.

If you want to bake your scrolls individually, we suggest you secure the end to the bottom of the scroll:

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5. How do I know if my dough has risen sufficiently?

A very good question! Hop on over to our other blog post "Baking with yeast & proofing 101" where you'll see pictures of what your dough should look like at both the first & second proofing stage.

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6. At what stage of the baking process can I hit the pause button & do it another day?

Another fantastic question! There are two stages where you can stop & continue the next day.

Stage 1: Once you've mixed your dough & allowed it proof at room temp. for 1-2 hours, you can refrigerate your dough for up to 3 days prior (ie. the "no-knead method").

Stage 2: After having sliced the log into scrolls, place them in the baking tin & rather than allowing them to proof, cover the tray(s) in cling wrap & pop them in the fridge. When you're ready to bake them up, take them out of the fridge & let it sit on the bench for ~30 mins. After, place them in a warm area to rise for 1-2hrs, & then bake them! 

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7. What's the difference between the 'Knead' & 'No-knead' method?

The only difference is the time factor! Using the no-knead method, you have to let your dough rest in the refrigerator overnight. So, rather than kneading your dough using a stand mixer or by hand, the yeast does all the hard work for you while you sleep!

Some bakers prefer the overnight fermentation method because they swear it gives their dough a richer flavour & better texture. But when we baked up our cinnamon rolls using both methods, we honestly couldn't tell the any difference! So choose whichever method is best suits you. 

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8. EXTRA TIPS!

The butter to be spread onto the dough needs to be SUPER soft: If it's winter where you are, the butter will not soften to the consistency that you need it to be. We microwaved our butter at the lowest defrost setting, at 10 secs intervals & checked. 

PS. It's no big deal if your butter has completely melted. Add the sugar/cinnamon mix to it to form a paste & then spread it on the dough. 

An even dough thickness is the most important: You're more likely to have evenly sized cinnamon scrolls that way, so make sure to pay attention to that!

Experiment & have fun with it: If you like walnuts, sultanas, or have some choc chips lying around, feel free to add them to your filling! If you have a waffle maker, why don't you make cinnamon scroll waffles instead? Or bake up your cinnamon scroll dough in a muffin tin.

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